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Latest on Nersa rooftop solar rules

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A recent article published by Tech Central states that the National Energy Regulator (NERSA), will in the near future withdraw proposed rules that would have required residential owners of rooftop solar panels to register their installations with NERSA.

The proposed SSEG rules were published for public comment by the National Energy Regulator (NERSA) on its website on 26 April.

On Monday (21 May), NERSA’s executive manager for electricity regulation, Mbulelo Ncetezo, told a news channel, SABC2, that the draft rules have been withdrawn until the Department of Energy gazettes a revised notice on this.

The article, which was originally published by Moneyweb, further states that the regulator indicated that it would review the proposed rules, but did not disclose any further details regarding the amendments.

To read the full article, click HERE.

ESI: NERSA withdraws its draft for small-scale embedded generation rules

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The Organisation Undoing Tax Abuse (OUTA) has welcomed the decision by NERSA to withdraw the proposed rules to govern the registration of Small-Scale Embedded Generation (SSEG) below 1 megawatt.

The proposed SSEG rules were published for public comment by the National Energy Regulator (NERSA) on its website on 26 April.

On Monday (21 May), NERSA’s executive manager for electricity regulation, Mbulelo Ncetezo, told a news channel, SABC2, that the draft rules have been withdrawn until the Department of Energy gazettes a revised notice on this.

“OUTA believes there is a lack of clarity by those in authority as to the need and purpose for the registration of small-scale energy generation and, more worrying, is NERSA’s readiness to administer the registration process,” says Ronald Chauke, OUTA’s energy portfolio manager.

Objecting NERSA’s proposed rules

Earlier this month, the organisation formally objected to NERSA’s proposed rules. Read more: NERSA clarifies draft rules consultation paper for SSEG

OUTA has called on the Department of Energy (DoE) to level the playing field and create an enabling environment by clarifying to what extent the public and commercially interested entities would be empowered to introduce self-sufficiency initiatives to meet their daily electricity requirements.

 

To read the full article, click HERE.

The history and bright future of solar energy

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As a source of life, light and warmth, the sun has fascinated humans for thousands of years. Since our species are resourceful by nature, it is no wonder that people have been finding ways to harness its power for centuries.

6 000 BC – 100 BC: Solar architecture.

Some ancient civilisations are known to have utilised the power of the sun through clever architecture. As early as 6 000 BC, Chinese families built their homes with a single, south-facing opening that caught the low winter sun and retained the heat inside.

Image 1: The remnants of an ancient Roman home in Pompeii. The covered porch (portico) naturally controlled the temperature inside the home. Photo: F. Tronchin/Warren, Peristyle, Casa della Venere in Conchiglia, Pompeii, BY-NC-ND 2.0

In the West, the respected Greek philosopher Socrates (470 – 399 BC) advocated the building of homes that faced southward and featured covered porches. These porticoes kept the warm rays at bay in summer, when the sun sits higher, but let the sunlight in during the winter. Socrates’ recommendation came at a time when Greece was experiencing an energy crisis: The price of coal and wood was rising and citizens had to find ways of becoming more energy efficient (which sounds rather familiar today).

The ancient Romans borrowed many ideas from their Greek neighbours and their solar energy solutions were no exception. They, too, applied solar architecture, but took it a step further by covering their windows with transparent materials such as mica or clear glass. They realised that transparent materials trapped the heat from the sun and, today, glass-covered windows are a standard feature of most modern buildings.

The most impressive example of how the ancient Romans used windows to utilise the sun’s power can be seen in their bathhouses. The bathhouses formed the backbone of Roman society and were centres for socialising, networking and relaxing. They were heated through the use of furnaces and hypocaust systems that circulated the hot air. To optimise heat generation and retention, the bathhouses often featured large, south-facing windows. The Baths of Caracalla, for one, featured an impressive south-facing window that spanned the whole wall and was covered in see-through glass. When the sun baked through the expansive window, it effectively turned the room into a sauna.

Circa 1 000 BC – 1500s AD: “Burning” mirrors

Around 3 000 years ago in China, reflective, concave bronze mirrors, called yang-sui, were used to start a fire by focussing the sunlight.

Image 2: An ancient solar device: The Chinese used bronze mirrors as sun-reflecting fire starters. Source: cleantechnica.com

The ancient Greeks and Romans were also known to have used reflective mirrors for lighting torches during religious ceremonies. According to legend, this technology was taken to the extreme by the thinker Archimedes when he constructed his fabled “death ray” in the siege of Syracuse in 212 BC. The “death ray” was created when the Greek soldiers used mirrored shields to turn the sunlight into a devastating blaze when it was deflected towards the invading Roman fleet.

 

Image 3: Archimedes’ “death ray” depicted by 17th century Italian painter Giulio Parigi. Source: Wikipedia

The idea of using a concave, reflective surface to harness sunlight was further explored by Renaissance luminary Leonardo da Vinci (1452 – 1519). He imagined a water heating system for the city of Florence that comprised a series of concave mirrors that turned the power of the sun into thermal energy.

1767: The Hot Box.

In 1767, Swiss polymath Horace-Bénédict de Saussure conducted a series of experiments to determine how well glass could capture solar heat. He built a glass-topped wooden box that was insulated with black cork and had a similar, but smaller, box placed on the inside. When the box was positioned directly in the sunlight, the temperature inside exceeded the boiling point of water. For obvious reasons, his contraption was dubbed the Hot Box and it paved the way for the thermal collectors we use to heat our homes and water today.

1839: The photovoltaic effect.

Think of solar energy and most of us think of shiny solar panels on rooftops. The solar cells contained within these PV (photovoltaic) panels work on a principle discovered by French physicist Edmond Becquerel. In 1839, he discovered that silver chloride submerged in an acidic solution and connected to platinum electrodes, can generate electricity when it is illuminated.

1896: Hot water.

In 1896, the American inventor Clarence Kemp used Saussure’s Hot Box concept as a basis for inventing the world’s first solar water heater. Kemp’s creation was simply a water tank inside a black box placed in direct sunlight.

Water heating technology has improved by leaps and bounds. Today, there are much more sophisticated and efficient solutions on the market, but the principal stay the same: The sun does most of the work.

1876 – 1900s: The first solar cells.

In 1876, Brits William Grylls Adams and his student, Richard Day, further developed the photovoltaic concept. Together, they created the first solar cells when they discovered that selenium produced electricity when it was exposed to light. Selenium was not efficient, but in 1953, Americans Calvin Fuller, Gerald Pearson and Daryl Chapin discovered that silicon is a highly effective alternative. Today, most solar panels are made with silicon PV cells.

2 000s and beyond.

In a report released in October 2017, the International Energy Agency (IEA) stated that solar energy is the world’s fastest growing source of power. According to the IEA, a third of the world w

Image 4: The world’s first solar-powered skyscraper, the Sol Invictus, could see the light in Melbourne in the near future.

ill be powered by the sun by 2060. The future of solar energy is indeed bright, with many modern thinkers coming up with brilliant new ideas for utilising the power of the sun:

Peddle Thorp, an Australian architecture firm, has draw up plans for a solar-powered skyscraper in Melbourne. It is called the Sol Invictus (“invincible sun”) and, while many buildings are built to deflect the harsh sunlight, this skyscraper welcomes it. Everything from its orientation to its oval shape and the height of its windows has been designed for optimal sun exposure. The dream is to fit 400 square meters of solar PV panels onto the roof and cover the façade in 3 500 square meters of solar PV cells.

One company is also paving the way for solar energy-generating roads. The US company Solar Roadways has designed a series of hexagonal tiles that are embedded with solar PV cells and can be placed over existing tarred roads.  Each tile holds a 44-watt solar panel and approximately 170 tiles could fully power a standard household. Solar Roadways started testing their prototype in October 2016, when they unveiled an installation of solar tiles in Idaho. The installation is powering a public restroom and a nearby water feature.

The future is here

Today, the latest advancements in efficient, renewable energy are available to just about any homeowner; and it is more affordable than what you might think. Even if you cannot afford to purchase a system straight away, Energy Partners Home Solutions offers various financing options to make it even easier for you to own a home energy system. To find out more, call Energy Partners Home Solutions on 0861 000 606 for a free, no-obligation home energy assessment or visit www.poweryourself.co.za.

Energy Partners, part of the PSG group of companies, has been helping some of South Africa’s most well-known businesses save on their energy costs for over seven years. Energy Partners Home Solutions, a division of Energy Partners, brings the same award-winning solutions to the residential and SME markets by combining state of the art energy e­fficiency technology, solar PV systems and expertise with Energy Partners Home Solutions’ own advanced products. By partnering with Energy Partners, clients can reduce their monthly electricity bills by up to 70%. For more information visit http://www.poweryourself.co.za/ or contact 0861 000 606.

Three things you should do before going off the grid

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In energy terms, “going off the grid” means living independently from our national electricity supplier and becoming self-sufficient by generating your own energy. An increasing number of homeowners are taking the leap towards grid-independence – and with good reason. Quality renewable energy solutions are often more dependable than the grid, and can help homeowners to beat the rising cost of electricity. Many conscientious people also choose renewable energy alternatives because they want to minimise their carbon footprint.

 

Image 1: You can break free from the grid and generate our own energy, but do your homework before you take the leap. 

 

Keep in mind that you can become more energy efficient without severing your ties to the grid completely. In other words, you still receive electricity from the national utility, but supplement it with self-generated clean energy and replace your old electric appliances and geysers with energy-efficient alternatives. You can also install a backup system that you can tap into when your self-generated electricity supply is insufficient.

For many people, it is all or nothing when it comes to grid independence. They might live in a remote area where there is no access to electricity, or simply be determined to have as little impact on the environment as possible. Whatever your reasons, if you are thinking of going 100% off the grid, there is one thing you should know: It is not that simple to get back onto the grid once you are off. That is why you have to ensure that you install a home energy solution that meets your energy requirements 100%, can be monitored and adjusted when necessary, and comes with a backup plan. Here are three things you should do before going off the grid:

  1. Define your energy requirements.

Consider factors such as the energy efficiency of your home, the size of your family, your budget, your location and your lifestyle. An energy expert will be able to guide you, but even before you speak to your supplier, you should have an idea of what you expect and need from a home energy system.

Image 2: The energy efficiency of your home will determine factors such as how many solar PV panels and storage batteries you will need to keep the lights on.

First, keep in mind that the size of your home does not necessarily determine the size of the energy system you require. A large house may have been designed and built for optimum energy efficiency, and could therefore use less electricity and require a smaller system than a more modest house. Take a look at your monthly electricity bill and compare costs with friends and neighbours – if you think you are paying too much for electricity, your home is probably not as energy efficient as it could be.

Your lifestyle is another important consideration. Some people naturally use less electricity than others. If your family goes to bed early, your electricity needs will be different to night owls that keep the lights and television on until midnight. Are you outdoorsy or go away every weekend? You may need less energy than homebodies.

Your location will also determine which home energy solution is best for you. The Western Cape, for example, has wet, overcast winters, so a heat pump is a better option than a solar water heater, because it does not need the sun to generate energy.

Lastly, your budget will ultimately dictate the size of your home energy solution and to what extent you can break free from the grid. Remember, even if you cannot spend a lot at first, you can always start small and build onto your system over time.

Once you have an overview of your unique energy requirements and know how much you are willing to spend, contact your supplier. They will conduct a full home energy assessment and work with you to find a customised home energy solution. Your monthly electricity bill is a useful tool in assessing your energy consumption, and in some instances a logger is installed over a certain period to determine your exact usage. This helps the installer to meet your expectations, while living up to their professional service standards.

  1. Monitor your system.

Once your home energy solution has been installed, ask your installer to help you monitor the system to ensure it is working as efficiently as possible. Many installers offer advanced solutions that can be used to monitor and control your system in real time. You will, for example, be able to see when the system is overloaded and about to trip, when the storage batteries are low or your solar PV system is not generating enough energy. This keeps you and your installer informed about the state of your system so that you can make the necessary adjustments to enhance its efficiency.

  1. Install an integrated heat pump and water storage tank as a backup.

Image 3: An integrated heat pump and water storage tank will help ensure you always have access to warm water and also save you money.

There are times when your home energy system may be unable to generate enough energy to fulfil your household’s needs. One such scenario is when there are long periods of cloudy days and your solar PV system is unable to generate enough energy for your household’s needs. It is quite costly to install enough batteries to meet your energy requirements during an unforeseen time of insufficient energy generation.

So to ensure your energy requirements are met, Energy Partners Home Solutions often suggests installing an integrated heat pump and water storage tank. Not only will this ensure that you will be able to take a warm shower even during a power outage or when you are not generating enough energy, but it will also help you save money: Water heating accounts for almost half of a household’s electricity consumption. Installing a heat pump and storage tank can cut this by 70%.

Speak to Energy Partners Home Solutions.

If you are ready to become less dependent on the grid, reduce your electricity bill by up to 70% and live greener, speak to the energy experts at Energy Partners Home Solutions. Their home energy solutions are modular, which means they can be customised to suit your unique energy needs and budget. The Energy Partners Home Solutions team will be there with you every step of the way: From installing the right solution, to monitoring and optimising your system.

Call Energy Partners Home Solutions on 0861 000 606 for a free, non-obligatory home energy assessment or visit www.poweryourself.co.za.

Energy Partners, part of the PSG group of companies, has been helping some of South Africa’s most well-known businesses save on their energy costs for over seven years. Energy Partners Home Solutions, a division of Energy Partners, brings the same award-winning solutions to the residential and SME markets by combining state of the art energy e­fficiency technology, solar PV systems and expertise with Energy Partners Home Solutions’ own advanced products. By partnering with Energy Partners, clients can reduce their monthly electricity bills by up to 70%. For more information visit http://www.poweryourself.co.za/ or contact 0861 000 606.

 

Blocking IPP signing a ‘delay tactic’ nothing more – Yelland

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Johannesburg – South Africa cannot fight the move towards renewable power, energy expert Chris Yelland said on Tuesday.

Yelland was commenting after the Department of Energy had put the signing of 27 independent power producer (IPP) contracts with private sector companies temporarily on hold in the wake of a last-minute court bid.

New Energy Minister Jeff Radebe was set to sign the 27 independent renewable energy contracts, including power purchase agreements, in Centurion on Tuesday morning.

But late on Monday, the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (Numsa) and Transform RSA approached the North Gauteng High Court to freeze the contracts, saying they would lead to jobs being lost in South Africa’s coal industry.

While Numsa has maintained that it did, in fact, obtain a court interdict to stop the contracts being signed, the Department of Energy has denied this.

The department said in a media statement on Tuesday that it decided to voluntarily postpone the signing “in the spirit of constitutionalism and the rule of law”.

Yelland, the investigative editor of EE Publishers, on Tuesday described the court bid as a “delay tactic”, saying the move towards renewable energy is a global trend which would not leave South Africa behind.

“You cannot fight the move to renewable energy, the sector just needs to ensure that there is a just transition,” he said.

To read the full article, click here.

South Africa comes second last on energy transition index

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Johannesburg- South Africa ranked 113th out of 114 countries in the Effective Energy Transitions Index 2018, a report by the World Economic Forum which considers the ability of countries to balance energy security and access with environmental sustainability and affordability.

“South Africa faces an uphill challenge in ensuring a secure, sustainable, reliable and affordable energy future for industry and society. The country’s energy challenges are marked by under-capacity, under-investment, and inefficiency,” the WEF’s energy team said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Energy Transitions Index found that South Africa currently meets more than 90% of its electricity demand through coal, which results in high per capita emission levels.

“There is immediate need to further diversify the fuel mix, and to create a positive environment for more investment to meet the energy infrastructure demands”, the WEF advised.

The report comes in the same week that the Department of Energy agreed to suspend the long awaited signing of the renewable energy agreement between Eskom and Independent Power Producers (IPP’s)  and wait instead for an outcome to the court challenge by the National Union of Metalworkers (Numsa) and Transform SA on March 27.

To read the full article, click here.

Eskom wants a 30% price increase

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If Eskom has its way‚ electricity prices will increase by more than 30% – but only if the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (Nersa) grants Eskom wishes.

Eskom submitted three Regulatory Clearing Account (RCA) applications to Nersa to try and recover R66-billion for over-expenditure and low sales in 2014/15‚ 2015/16 and 2016/17.

Eskom gave their projected sales and costs to Nersa as part of their RCA applications. Eskom can then retrospectively present the actual figures. If Nersa believes the costs were within Eskom’s control‚ the power utility has to pay for it. Otherwise‚ it is worked into tariff increases to recover it via consumers.

Former senior Eskom executive Ted Blom from Mining and Energy Advisors said if Nersa granted Eskom’s wishes‚ the public is funding the power utility’s “gravy train”.

Blom believes the backlog Eskom is trying to recover is due to corruption and mismanagement.

“The corruption is to a large extent related to the Gupta years.”

Energy analyst Chris Yelland believes looking at the past it is unlikely that Nersa will grant Eskom their wishes. Eskom asked for a 19.9% tariff hike in 2018/19‚ but in December Nersa granted only 5.23%.

“Eskom will be lucky if they get half of what they apply for‚” Yelland said.

“Nersa may decide a good percentage of that was costs that were under Eskom’s control and sales volumes that are under Eskom’s control. They may grant a portion of that R66-billion.”

Blom said Eskom overestimated their sales and assumed the economy would grow 5% annually.

Click here to read the full article.

Tariff increase highlights homeowners’ need for alternative energy solutions

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The National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) today presented its decision regarding Eskom’s proposed 26.9% increase in electricity tariffs for municipalities, announcing that the national utility has the green light to raise prices by 5.2% from 1 July 2018.

Cala van der Westhuizen, Head of Marketing and Sales at Energy Partners Home Solutions, a division of Energy Partners and part of the PSG group of companies, comments that the financial burden on consumers in relation to utility tariffs is becoming unsustainable.

“Nersa received over 23 000 responses regarding Eskom’s application, which shows that consumers are becoming increasingly vocal about the fact that they can no longer afford exponentially increasing energy costs. In light of this it is becoming ever more important for homeowners to consider alternative sources of electricity to power their homes. Unlike coal-fired power, alternative energy solutions have become more affordable and accessible to consumers.”

According to van der Westhuizen, the average home’s electricity spend can be reduced substantially through the use of innovative energy efficiency and alternative energy solutions.

“Homeowners can use their own discretion as to how much they want to save and invest in energy efficiency, but most will find that even small changes could make a noticeable difference. Simple measures like replacing the home’s regular light bulbs with energy efficient LED lighting can already cut the average household’s monthly electricity bill by as much as 30%. More advanced options like replacing the conventional geyser with a heat pump and hot water storage solution can reduce the home’s reliance on the national grid by up to 50%.”

Van der Westhuizen says that a larger installation, which includes a solar photovoltaic system, heat pump, energy storage and energy management system can shrink the home’s total monthly energy costs by up to 80%.

“Even though renewable energy is becoming more affordable and will result in future savings; initial installation cost is still one of the major challenges for most homeowners. A fully integrated solution will cost anything from R80,000. Luckily, there are various types of financing available which make these solutions accessible to consumers while still achieving significant savings each month.”

Van der Westhuizen advises all homeowners to evaluate their home’s energy needs and to find out what renewable energy solutions will work for their home. “An energy solutions service provider can provide an accurate assessment of not only what the home needs, but also which solutions would be the best suited for the home – whether this is a rooftop solar installation, heat pumps or other options.”

Energy Partners Home Solutions offers customised solar solutions, as well as various financing options for consumers. “As a registered financial services provider, many of our clients purchase systems that are financed by us and which they can easily pay off over time,” van der Westhuizen concludes.

For a no-obligation consultation with a highly experienced energy consultant, contact Energy Partners Home Solutions on 0861 000 606. For more information, visit www.poweryourself.co.za.

 

About Energy Partners Home Solutions

Energy Partners, part of the PSG group of companies, has helped some of South Africa’s most well-known businesses save on their energy costs for over seven years. Energy Partners Home Solutions, a division of Energy Partners, brings the same award-winning solutions to the residential and SME markets by combining state of the art energy e­fficiency technology, solar PV systems and expertise with Energy Partners Home Solutions’ own advanced products. By partnering with Energy Partners, clients can reduce their monthly electricity bills by up to 70%. For more information visit http://www.poweryourself.co.za/ or contact 0861 000 606.

About Energy Partners

Founded in 2008, Energy Partners is a leading energy solutions provider in South Africa that provides clients with innovative solutions (including fully outsourced supply contracts – e.g. steam generation) to suit their needs. Energy Partners has built a high quality team of talented individuals and robust processes which offer end-to-end solutions and integrate the different components of energy optimisation to deliver optimum results – including capital solutions that put clients in a positive cash flow positions from day one. Industries in which Energy Partners specialise include: food retail, retail, healthcare, hospitality, food processing and logistics. For more information visit www.energypartners.co.za

About PSG

PSG Group is an investment holding company consisting of underlying investments that operate across industries which include financial services, banking, private equity, agriculture and education. PSG Group has a market capitalisation in excess of R40bn, with our largest investment being a 30,7% interest in Capitec.

Additional group companies include Energy Partners, Impak, Curro and Capitec.

EPHS Holiday Power Savings

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Are rising electricity tariffs getting you down? Lighten up your festive season with these 7 energy saving tips.

By this time of the year, most of us have less spring in our step and more slump in our shoulders. Luckily, the December holidays are just around the corner. While you relax and recharge your batteries for the new year, try these 7 tips for saving energy:

  1. Be festive with solar.

Whether you power your whole household with solar PV panels, or simply decorate your home and Christmas tree with solar lights, every bit helps when it comes to saving electricity this festive season.

Festive-season

  1. Do more than just switch off.

Before you lock up your home and hit the road for the holidays, be sure to not only switch off all of your lights and appliances, but also unplug them from the wall sockets. Electronics that are plugged in can “leak” up to 0.05 kWh, even if they are switched off. That is the equivalent of wasting about R0.05 to R0.10 worth of electricity every hour that you are away, which can equate to more than R30 per appliance over a two-week holiday!

  1. Braai for a South African Christmas.

The festive season is a time for sharing good food with family and friends. This year, rather than cooking traditional roasts (which are more suited to cooler climates in any case) consider having a braai on Christmas Day. Not only will the electricity-hungry oven be switched off, but you will be spending less time in the kitchen and more time enjoying the company of your favourite people.

If you need inspiration for an electricity-free feast, take a look at this video on how to prepare a Christmas braai.

  1. Go off-grid for a few days.

Consider breaking away to a camping spot or a remote cabin where there is no electricity or cellphone reception. This is a great way to save electricity while you relax and reconnect with your loved ones in the absence of digital distractions. Remember to pack your LED flashlights and solar-powered lanterns!

camping

  1. Give a gift that keeps on saving.

Why not help those close to you save electricity too? Solar jars and candles make good, inexpensive gifts. Also look for energy-efficient or battery-operated alternatives to gifts that require power to work.

Gift-that-keeps-on-giving

  1. Be energy-savvy with your bonus.

Many people use their year-end bonuses to purchase large, pricier household items, such as new electronic appliances. When you go shopping, look out for the latest, energy-efficient models. For example, an Energy Partners Home Solutions heat pump absorbs ambient air and converts it into energy to heat water much more efficiently than a regular electrical geyser. In fact, it will decrease your cost of water heating by as much as 70%! When it comes to cooking, one of the latest energy-savvy innovations is an induction stove, which turns magnetic energy (from the steel pot touching the stove top) into heat energy. Also look out for efficient washing machines and dishwashers that not only use less electricity because they work better and faster, but will also help you to save water.

Remember that if you invest in a new energy-efficient appliance this season, it will pay off well into the new year, when electricity tariffs will be even higher.

  1. Give your fridge and freezer a break.

Fridges and freezers use a lot of electricity. Going on holiday is a good excuse for clearing them out, giving them a summer spring clean and unplugging them for a few days. In the spirit of giving, donate any unwanted food to people in need.

Another great way to ensure your fridge is running more efficiently in 2018 is by checking that the rubber seal around the door is still intact and seals properly. If you plan on living leaner this January and not have a lot of food in your fridge, consider this tip: Cold items keep other items cold, which means that an empty fridge has to work harder to retain its low temperature. So, to increase your fridge’s efficiency even when stocks are low, fill it with a few large bottles of water.

Updated-Christmas-wish

Save energy throughout the year.

An efficient home energy system can help you save up to 70% on your monthly electricity bill. To find out more, call Energy Partners Home Solutions on 0861 000 606 for a free, non-obligatory home energy assessment or visit www.poweryourself.co.za.

Energy Partners, part of the PSG group of companies, has been helping some of South Africa’s most well-known businesses save on their energy costs for over seven years. Energy Partners Home Solutions, a division of Energy Partners, brings the same award-winning solutions to the residential and SME markets by combining state of the art energy e­fficiency technology, solar PV systems and expertise with Energy Partners Home Solutions’ own advanced products. By partnering with Energy Partners, clients can reduce their monthly electricity bills by up to 70%. For more information visit http://www.poweryourself.co.za/ or contact 0861 000 606.

 

Preparing for the electricity tariff increases before it hits

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South Africans could be paying over 26% more for electricity in 2018. Here’s how you can soften the blow.

 

Preparing for the electricity tariff increases before they hit

Eskom could soon announce significantly higher electricity tariffs for 2018.

Eskom recently announced that they want to increase their electricity tariffs for municipal customers by a whopping 26.9% from 1 July 2018. The National Energy Regulator of South Africa (Nersa) is reviewing the proposed increase and will announce its decision on 13 December 2017. If it gives Eskom the green light, it will be yet another blow to South Africans’ pockets.

The good news is that there are energy alternatives that can, in fact, help you to save money on electricity. It is now easier and more affordable than ever before for homeowners to become less dependent on the grid and to generate their own clean, free energy. In fact, a state-of-the-art, properly installed home energy system can help you to cut your electricity bill by up to 70% (and in some instances even more). So, make your home immune to yet another electricity tariff hike by powering yourself with efficient energy solutions.

Efficient energy solutions versus the new Eskom tariffs.

The question is: What will the state of your electricity bill be once the new Eskom tariffs kick in, and will these efficient energy solutions really make a difference?

Take a look at the graph below. Here you can see a comparison between four possible situations for an average household with a current electricity bill of R2 500. Each grouping represents different variances of energy efficiency and self-generation that range from having nothing installed, to owning a highly efficient water heating solution (from R31 365*[i]), a full home energy solution (from R110 399*) and being 100% off the grid (starting from R233 294*). The graph shows what the electricity bill would be in each of these scenarios before and after the suggested tariff hike. If the proposed electricity price increase comes into effect, the household that is fully dependent on the grid will be paying R3 125 by the middle of 2018. That equates to an extra R625 per month, which is money that could be spent on another bag of groceries every month, or invested in education or a savings account.

What is most apparent is that the household that installed a full home energy system will be saving more than R2 000 per month after the tariff hike. If you consider that this system can generate electricity for up to 25 years, the investment value starts to make a lot of sense.

graphs1

 

There obviously is the question of affordability and if you, like most South Africans, have tightened your belt, you will be glad to hear that a home energy system is easier to afford than what you might think. Our systems are excellent investments and typically generate a return of 15% or more on what you have spent. We do, however, understand that not all homeowners have the cash on hand to purchase a system right away. That is why we offer three easy options for you to install an energy-saving system:

  1. Cash purchase: We offer best-in-class technology designed by our expert engineers and installed by our highly experienced teams. You can expect to pay competitive pricing for an investment that will not only save you a lot of money, but also add value to your home.
  2. Financed purchase: As a registered financial services provider, we can tailor-make a financed purchase that suits your budget and requirements. We aim to make your payment as close to your savings as possible, and after the agreed period the system belongs to you and will provide you with free electricity for another 20 years or longer.
  3. Performance Lease Agreement (PLA): You can lease a system from us at a rate determined by the energy generated and used by your household. With the only cost being a very low installation fee this is the easiest way to get a system on your roof and start sharing in the savings immediately. Many clients find that, thanks to their savings, they are soon able to purchase the system.

You can read more about Energy Partners Home Solutions’ smart energy solutions here.

Copy of Copy of French COLLECTION (4)

Energy Partners Home Solutions’ comprehensive, efficient home energy systems lead to significant electricity savings and very happy clients.

 

To find out more about powering yourself, call Energy Partners Home Solutions on 0861 000 606 for a free, no-obligation home energy assessment or visit www.poweryourself.co.za.

Energy Partners, part of the PSG group of companies, has been helping some of South Africa’s most well-known businesses save on their energy costs for over seven years. Energy Partners Home Solutions, a division of Energy Partners, brings the same award-winning solutions to the residential and SME markets by combining state of the art energy e­fficiency technology, solar PV systems and expertise with Energy Partners Home Solutions’ own advanced products. By partnering with Energy Partners, clients can reduce their monthly electricity bills by 70%. For more information visit http://www.poweryourself.co.za/ or contact 0861 000 606.

[i] all prices stated are exclusive of VAT and estimates that do not include non-standard design, installations and specific requirements. Contact EPHS today to have one of our experts help you find out what a solution would cost you.